Amanda Portrait Day 23 – Like a Prayer

Amanda day 23

This ethereal photo of Amanda was taken on her birthday. We had a Girl’s Day Out and she was served a free cake, complete with candle, at the restaurant.

I told her to, “Make a wish!” and she immediately put her hands together and leaned over the candle thoughtfully.

It was the sweetest moment. I wanted to do a watercolor of this image but I decided to sketch it first.

10702190_341207712724005_6653208745851353840_n

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, a sibling who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait Day 22 – Lunch with the Cast of “Friends”

Amanda Day 22 Friends.jpg

On her Bucket List, Amanda included, “Lunch with the cast of ‘Friends.'” She added, “They are probably all vegetarians. Except Courteney Cox. She probably eats meat.”

So today’s portrait of Amanda includes the whole ‘Friends’ cast.

I’m sure Amanda is giving them some hilarious story about her experiences in the public eye. And maybe keeping Jennifer Aniston away from her pizza.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, a sibling who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

Posted in amanda, celebrities, down syndrome, empathy, friends, TV | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait – Day 21, Watercolor and Kindergarten Story

Amanda Day 21

This is how Amanda looked when my parents tried to mainstream her in the public school system. She started kindergarten with the other local kids…. Until she had an unfortunate run-in with her teacher.

The following is an excerpt from our book, “The North Side of Down.”

Dad served on the school board and when Amanda was six years old, she was inducted into kindergarten with some fifteen other children her age. Every day, I walked her to school, holding her pudgy hand the entire mile.  She always made me late.  I was in high school by that time and I always had to go to the principal’s office and ask for a late slip.  I didn’t mind.  I was a terrible introvert, encumbered by crippling shyness, and I would do anything to avoid the crushing social obligation that was school.  Besides, the first hour was gym.  The only thing worse than ducking the onslaught of round, red, bouncing missiles in dodge ball, was the humiliation of being picked last for every team, every time.

            Amanda and I took our time getting to school, and the morning walk became our own pleasant little ritual.  In the afternoon I would rush straight home to watch Grizzly Adams reruns with her while our mother napped.  We would sing the theme song and I would help her practice pronouncing her words.  “Ceecee,” she called me.

            “Nannn-see,” I would say, exaggerating my lip movements.

            “Ceecee,” she repeated dutifully.

            Amanda’s hair fell in golden ringlets around her pink face.  Combined with her navy eyes, this gave her an exceptionally angelic look that belied her bouts of stubbornness.  Once she made up her mind to sit down, we couldn’t move her.  She would turn to rubber.  We would grab her rib cage and try to pick her up, and she would slide limply out of our hands like jelly. 

            Unfortunately, when it came to Amanda’s tantrums, the kindergarten teacher exhibited even less patience than I did.  Amanda came home with bruises on her arms where the teacher had pinched her black and blue.  “She pulled my hair,” Amanda said to Dad.  There was a volatile school board meeting that evening.  He nearly came to blows with the superintendent.  After that, Amanda was withdrawn from the mainstream program and was bussed to a Special Education class in Rudyard some forty miles away.

North with BRAG

Sadly, I don’t believe this teacher was ever reprimanded, and I think she kept her job. Dealing with people with Down syndrome can take a lot of patience and I have seen my sibs lose their cool with Amanda more than once. I am no exception.

However, we are now all in mid-life, and it’s time to start thinking of the bigger picture. I would welcome any one of my siblings who wanted to re-establish a relationship with me, based on Amanda’s best interest. The gesture would have to be genuine, putting Amanda’s well-being first and foremost.

This would require setting aside personal agenda, dominance issues, misogyny, wealth discrimination, slanderous behavior — just normal interaction on behalf of a sister who loves her family.

I am capable of this. Are you?

I know, fat chance.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, a sibling who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait, Day 20 – Watercolor – I wish I knew what she was singing!

AmandaDay20

Before she was old enough to even talk very well, Amanda was singing.  My mom snapped a Polariod of her ate age two, singing into a jump rope, with one shoe on and the other foot bare. The picture pretty much tells you all you need to know about Amanda!

I have no idea what she was singing. She sometimes made up her own songs, which she belted with as much enthusiasm as one coming through the stereo speakers. But if she was singing along to the record player, my guess is that it was probably Englebert Humperdinck’s “Kiss Me Goodbye.” That was my mother’s favorite song and at the end of it, Amanda and I would finish dramatically by saying, “Darling, kiss me goodbye.”

babymanda

This was in 1972, before the days of cell phones and karaoke machines. Baby pics from this generation are on film. The colors fade and change. It was a lot harder to get candid shots than it is today.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, a sibling who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

 

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait Day 19 – Watercolor

Amanda Day 19

This is how the days trickle past. In two more days it will be three weeks since I have started painting Amanda.

It is easy to neglect those who love you. Don’t let your life slip by without sharing bits of your days with those who matter to you. The modern world makes it so easy to check in.

We will never get these days back.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, a sibling who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait – Day 18 – Profile, 2 – And Dad

Amanda Day 18

On this day in 2013, my dear Dad breathed his last — and left a wake of pure chaos. Apparently, he was the one policing factor that kept family members behaving at least somewhat like human beings.

Unfortunately, his kids have not opted to follow his example of kindness, gentle humor and humanity. He was a great man in many ways. He devoted thought and energy into making the world a better place. He was a Merchant Marine. He was a town sheriff. He served many years on the school board, and he founded a nonprofit business that gave jobs to people with disabilities.

He was a wonderful dad. He worked at the quarry and ran his own well drilling business on the side. But he still found time to have dinner with us and play with us and take us swimming and talk about life. When Clifford came along, he welcomed him and built him a corral.

dadcliffy

He had a self-effacing sense of humor. He wanted to live life by a strict set of ethics and he tried to pass these standards on to his offspring.

I repeat: He TRIED.

I wonder about the marked failure of a parent when his kids turn out to be creeps. I have long believed, though, that there comes a point when people make a choice. They follow the example, or they don’t.

I don’t hold this against Dad. I hold these siblings responsible for their behavior. All of it. Dad tried to do the right thing, and any attempt to smear his name now, or say that he didn’t stand up to his agreements, or to try to snow his memory by calling him less than he was, is pure hogwash.

Dadmanda2

When Amanda was born, Dad welcomed her, the living example of how love can make a person flourish, no matter what their situation is. I will never forget the hours he spent rocking her in that chair, helping her build strength in her legs and neck. I will always remember the way he would speak out loud, reading my thoughts accurately in my defense, when I could say nothing.

He had my back.

Shame on those who have failed him. You fail Amanda and me, but most of all you fail yourselves.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, a sibling who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

 

 

 

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait, Day 17 – Profile

Amanda17

This was one of my favorite early photos of Amanda. I was trying to be like a real photographer and she would oblige me by posing. I told her to go to the window and look out, and this was the result. Those old 110 photos have all faded and were pretty grainy, but this one is still pretty nice, probably due to the lighting.

Amanda age 8

I have another one I really love, but I think it calls for a watercolor.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it has been 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Problem With Anniversaries

Yesterday I had started to cough, and I had completely forgotten why. I knew the day was coming up, but I hadn’t made the connection. Now I know. Thanks in part to Clifford, I will make it through this next anniversary tomorrow. I am so glad to have this reminder of how to do that.

Diary of a Misplaced Yooper: Cliffy's Mom's Blog

Both my parents had the nerve to die on the day before a holiday.

Mom died on December 31, 2010.

Dad died on March 30, 2013.

That year, March 30 fell on a Saturday, the day before Easter.

942160_10153521674578907_4648742818735060362_n.jpg

So Dad pretty much messed up Easter, no matter where it lands, AND the 30th of March.

Yippee.

Not only that, but the way he went was pretty horrific.

After I struggled for an entire summer trying to figure out what the heck was wrong with him, getting him to various doctors and specialists, and neck surgery and a new pacemaker and then an oxygen tank and visits with cardiologists and pulmonologists and VA doctors and, and, and… Every week, usually two or three times a week, we were visiting a doctor. And, well gee, they just couldn’t figure out why his back hurt.

Eventually I had him admitted in Petoskey. He…

View original post 1,510 more words

Posted in empathy | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait Day 16 – Down Syndrome in Black and White

AmandaDay16

Once in awhile Amanda and I like to hang out at the DeTour Harbor. We walk out on the dock and watch the freighters go by. Mostly, Amanda likes to pose for pictures.

I have a lot of memories of the harbor, including a few of the very best ones — like the day Amanda and I shouted out our ages to the Saint Mary’s River, because it was her birthday. Or the day we looked toward the setting sun and saw an osprey crash down right before us and snatch a fish out of the shallows, flying off with drops showering down like glittering confetti. The air is cold and clean there, and Amanda is rosy-cheeked and happy.

amanda-and-me-at-detour-harbor

Today I chose a quick pencil study to portray Amanda. A couple of weeks ago a mediator contacted her guardian’s lawyer on my behalf. She said that I have been restricted from talking to Amanda for 8 months because, “I see things too much in black and white.”

This is a perfect example of the psychotic thinking involved in guardianship — a dysfunction that likes to stir things up, place blame, keep the drama rolling. My sister wanted to come and stay with me for a few days. Plain and simple. My sister would like to talk to me on the phone once a week or every few days or whenever she wants to. Again, very simple. No punishments, no restrictions, no weird control issues or agenda. If that is black and white, you bet. I am happy to claim it.

This is what happens when there is no reason for the abusive behavior. They make up a reason — they say words that mean nothing.  Anything to justify what amounts to needless cruelty, toward a person who has no choices.

I know there are many others who are suffering with similar circumstances. For the most part, the public doesn’t care. Our extended family has been surprisingly apathetic. No one seems to be questioning the guardian’s unreasonable overreach of authority.

No one, that is, except for me.

But this is going to change.

A friend today directed me to a website featuring a book that addresses this issue. The book is called, “Fugitive from Injustice” by Danny Tate. He signed himself in to rehab, entrusting power of attorney to his brother. Danny Tate got taken for the ride of his life. To his astonishment, he learned the thing that others among us know: The law does not help a ward.

The article reads:

“The public is generally disinterested or dismissive of probate abuse – at least until it happens to them. Disinterest manifests with a common position that “these things can’t happen” while the dismissive stance usually includes “you must have done something to deserve it.” Besides being patently wrong on both counts, these mindsets are also dangerously naïve.

Disgruntled family members, wannabe heirs and/or unscrupulous attorneys abundantly populate our society. These parties in concert with assorted members of the legal industry (judges and other court-related personnel) can functionally weaponize the court system to the total detriment of an unsuspecting target.

Financial professionals from CPAs to banks sometimes play a role. Conservatorship abuse cases from across the country surface routinely reveal Adult Protective Services (APS) employees, professional guardians, social workers as well as medical personnel responsible for evaluations (physical and psychological) and even proprietors of facilities that house incapacitated or disabled individuals involving themselves in questionably motivated cases. Call it asset looting, property poaching or estate hijacking – any of these parties can (and too often do) derive direct or indirect benefit from abusive probate actions.”

The irony, of course, is that we aren’t rich. My folks had a little bit of Drummond Island property and that’s it. Amanda’s SSI was a big deal, apparently. But it’s crazy how desperate people become. All humanity disappears in the lust for power and greed. So stupid.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, who is not allowing us to have contact. On March 27 it was 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

485b0-529886_10150809106038907_1248242172_n

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amanda Portrait, Day 15 – Down Syndrome and Bungee Jumping

Amanda15.jpg

When Amanda told me she wanted to put bungee jumping on her bucket list, I was all, “Yeah, okay. You have fun with that.”

She added this to other things I would not partake in, like skydiving and riding in a hot air balloon.

My initial thought was that Amanda’s body is too soft and messed up to handle bungee jumping. This made me curious and I googled, “People who have Down Syndrome who have done Bungee Jumping.” But the results were mostly of people who were doing it as fundraisers for folks with disabilities. I would appreciate hearing from anyone who fits this description, and what they thought of it, so I can someday let Amanda know.

I have no question if given the opportunity, Amanda would do it. She would strap on the harness, make sure her knee brace was in place, hand me her wig, take a deep breath and step off the platform, and I would hear her bowel-wrenching roar all the way to the first bounce.

Then she would be dangling from the cable at the bottom, swinging upside down, yelling my name and telling me how great it is, and I should try it.

No, thank you! *shudder*

When I took her to Cedar Point, she got really mad at me because I wouldn’t go on even the tamest of those rides. I enjoyed walking around with her though. And my ex was not afraid to accompany her on the gut-sucking roller coasters. The pictures were hilarious. Amanda’s face, with her bald head and her mouth that big, half-moon hole, and her eyes bulging, could rival any cartoon character.

She is a prime example, a master of Living In the Moment.

Amanda has Down syndrome and is currently being held by her guardian, who is not allowing us to have contact. Today, March 27 it is 8 months since I have spoken with my sister. I am doing a portrait of her every day until I hear from Amanda.

“I’m the guardian and you’re not.” That’s the reason her guardian gave when he refused Amanda’s request to visit me in summer 2016.

A few warning signals of guardianship abuse:

1. The guardian and/or conservator treats you as an outsider instead of a relative, friend, or loved one.

2. The guardian/conservator sees to it that your loved one doesn’t have a phone.

3. When you visit, the guardian “hovers” or even employs someone to hover so you’re not alone with your loved one.

4. You are denied input about your loved one’s care – the doctor won’t talk to you – you are shut out.

5. The guardian/conservator refuses to take your call or answer your questions.

6. Your loved one doesn’t get his/her mail.

7. If your loved one is in a nursing home, you’re only allowed to visit in the dining room or recreation room.

8. You start seeing questionable documents and realize financial accounts are closed or changed and the statements have been diverted to the guardian/conservator.

9. You discover the taxes haven’t been paid — or even filed.

10. The nursing facility tells you when you visit, you “upset” your family member or upset the staff.

11. Items are missing from your loved one’s home.

12. Your loved one appears to be more sluggish, perhaps even dazed.

The days of guardians running the show are coming to an end. There is help available.  Click the link below:

http://www.stopguardianabuse.org

Posted in amanda, empathy | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment