Why Don’t We Talk Nice?

Donald Trump has been the target of a host of vicious humor for years, even before his inauguration.  Now, as he blunders through a disastrous presidency he might as well have just painted a big ol’ bullseye on the middle of that wide, wide necktie.

Trump was the featured guest at a couple of roasts where he was skewered by an enthusiastic mob of celebs, who said things as quoted on Vulture.com:

“And Donald, I’m not even sure if you’re aware of this, but the only difference between you and Michael Douglas from the movie Wall Street is that no one’s going to be sad when you get cancer.”

What?!

“And now you’re going to run for president. Don’t you think that’s a really cool idea, you guys? You’ll keep them honest. You’ll keep them honest, Donald. Personally I hope you win because I can’t wait for the assassi… I mean inauguration.”

Even if part of me agrees, I am not amused.

“You put up more useless hotels than an autistic kid playing Monopoly.”

Yeah, let’s bring kids with autism into it. That’s cool.

The remarks are so cutting that witnesses would be inclined to feel sorry for the candidate.

For a minute.

Seriously, though, our culture has gone overboard with the slams. Is this who we’ve become?

When it comes to verbal repartee, I’ve never been that quick on my feet. The cutting banter so popular in our era was at its peak around the dinner table when I was a kid. The insults flew faster than dialogue in an episode of Roseanne.  My sibs were really good at it.

It was hard to keep up, but the real reason was probably because I was just usually too soft-hearted to go there. For the most part, I can’t even fling insults at my dogs. (Who, by the way, would understand every word.)

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Call it lame. I’m not sorry.

This type of humor is boosted to new heights by sitcoms where smart-mouthed kids talk back to their parents and people rarely have a thoughtful word to say to each other. This has enabled the mentality of hatred becoming a standard for our society.

Trump is a figurehead in this slapstick, angry type of humor, the kind that makes us laugh but makes us feel a little awful at the same time. We’ve become addicted to the surge of emotion released by these venomous triggers.

Ellen DeGenerous has set a good example of turning toward an alternative of kindness. She is hilarious without having to simultaneously destroy someone. She can dish out good natured kidding without gutting a person.

I want to see a new Policy of Kindness.

I challenge our community of writers to find that sweet spot, a joke so artful that it makes the audience weep tears of hilarity, not of pain.

In the anti-Trump movement, maybe we are already experiencing an enthusiastic turnaround in the nation’s mentality. He is an example of how NOT to behave. He is our wakeup call. Our world needs a new view of what’s funny.

Perhaps the current pres is like a zit. He can be the figurative swelling, painful pimple that we bust, bleed out and then heal.

…Was I too mean just then?

 

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About Nancy J. Bailey

Artist, author, bad karaoke singer. Woodsy ragamuffin. Mom of a horse named Clifford who plays fetch and paints with watercolors. He visits libraries and schools with me, to promote literacy and making the world a better place. Yes, he is house trained, no, he doesn't live in my house! I have written three books about Clifford. But my newest book, THE NORTH SIDE OF DOWN, is co-written by my awesome sister Amanda, who has Down syndrome. Her unexpected one-liner wisecracks can always make me laugh. If you make me laugh, you've made my day!
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